Cloud computing: strategy and IT readiness – Transformation in IT

Here is the first of a series of articles that provide both business and IT executives insights into the key issues that they should consider when evaluating cloud services, paying particular attention to business and legal ramifications of moving to the cloud environment, whether it is private, hybrid or public.

cloud-question-mark-710x345For the last few decades, IT organisations have been the only option for provisioning IT resources for projects. Indeed, all new projects would involve IT, and the IT team was responsible for acquiring, architecting and delivering the solution that would sustain the application/project during its lifecycle, planning for upgrades along the way.
This led to silo-based infrastructures – and teams -, often designed for peak demand, without possibilities of efficiency gains between projects. The introduction of compute virtualization, first for test/dev and then for production, showed other options were possible and available and that by aggregating requirements across projects, IT could get significant efficiencies of scale and costs while getting more flexibility and speed to market, as provisioning a virtual server suddenly became a matter of days, rather than weeks or months.
Over time, IT started applying these same methods to storage and network and these showed similar flexibility, scalability and efficiency improvements. These gains, together with automation capabilities and self-service portals, were combined over time to become what we know as ‘cloud offerings’.
In parallel to this, IT, in some organisations, has become structured, organized, usually silo’d, and, unfortunately, somewhat slow to respond to business needs. This has led to a slow erosion of IT’s power and influence over IT resources acquisition, delivery and management. Coupled with the existing commercial/public cloud options these days, capital is rapidly leaving the organisation for 3rd party public cloud vendors, also known as shadow IT. This raises concerns, not the least of which being that funds are sent outside the organisation to address tactical issues, typically without regard to legal implications, data security or cost efficiency. These issues highlight IT’s necessity to react faster, become more customer driven, deliver more value and provide its stakeholders with flexibility matching that of public cloud. Essentially, IT needs to evolve to become a business partner; cloud computing providing the tools by which IT offers flexibility, scalability and speed to market that the business units are looking for in today’s market.

Benoit Quintin, Director Cloud Services, ESI Technologies