Cloud Strategy: technological impacts

Here is part four of our series covering the key issues to consider before adopting cloud technologies. This article focuses specifically on technological impacts to consider.

Not all software technology is created equal. Indeed, not every application will migrate gracefully to the cloud, some will never tolerate the latency, while others were never designed to have multiple smaller elements working together, rather than a few big servers. This means your business applications will need to be evaluated for cloud readiness. Indeed, this is possibly the largest technological hurdle, but, as with all technology, this may prove to be easier to solve that some of the other organisational issues.

One should look at the application’s architecture (n-tiered or monolithic), tolerance to faults/issues (e.g. latency, network errors, services down, servers down) and how the users consume the application (always from a PC, from the office, or fully decentralized, with offline and mobile access), to evaluate options for migrating an application to the cloud. Current growth rate and state of the organisation are often times mirrored in its IT consumption rate and requirements. Certainly, an organisation that’s under high growth rates or launching a project where growth is not easily identifiable can possibly benefit significantly from a scalable, elastic cloud model, whereas an organisation with slower growth, familiar / standard projects and predictable IT requirements will not likely assess the value of cloud computing the same way. Accountability of resources and traceability of all assets in use may be of bigger concern.

Architecture, applications and legacy environments are all technological considerations that should be factored in any cloud computing viability & readiness assessment, but that should probably not be the main driver for your cloud strategy.

Benoit Quintin, Director Cloud Services – ESI Technologies

Cloud Strategy: legal impacts across the organization

Here is part three of our series covering the key issues to consider before adopting cloud technologies. This article focuses specifically on legal impacts on your organization.

“Location, location, location”. We’re more accustomed to hearing this in the context of the housing market. However, where your company’s headquarters reside, where your company does business and where its subsidiaries are located directly impact how you need to manage sensitive information, such as strategic projects, HR/personnel information, etc.; essentially, IT needs to account for data sovereignty laws and regulations.

Various countries have already voted or are moving towards voting on more restrictive data sovereignty legislations that will control the transit of information out of border. For example, the Canadian Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) already governs how IT organisations can collect, use and disclose personal information in the course of commercial business. In addition, the Act contains various provisions to facilitate the use of electronic documents. Essentially, all personally identifiable information must stay in country, at rest and in transit, meaning that using a cloud provider in the US or any other country with said data could expose the company – and you – to a lawsuit, unless the cloud provider can guarantee no aforementioned data ever leaves the country at any time, including for redundancy/DR purposes.

While the previous Act covered what must be protected, the American law (the USA Freedom Act, and its previous incarnation, the Patriot Act) enables the US government to access any and all data residing on its soil, without owner’s authorization, need for warrant and without even the need to notice the owner before or after the fact. The few data privacy provisions in the bill apply to American citizens and entities only. This means all data housed in the US are at risk, especially if said data is owned by an organisation whose headquarters are out of country.

If in Europe, laws vary from country to country, we find that the regulations on data protection are becoming more stringent, requiring the establishment of procedures and controls to protect personal data and obtaining the explicit authorization of persons to collect and use their information. All this imposes guidelines to the use of the cloud within the country or outside their borders.

Typically, data sovereignty should be a concern for most organisations when looking at cloud and, as the current trend is for countries to vote in more stringent laws, any and all cloud strategy should account for local, national and international regulations.

Benoit Quintin – Director Cloud Services – ESI Technologies

Cloud Strategy: business impacts across the organization

Here is the second part of our series covering the key issues to consider before adopting cloud technologies. This article focuses specifically on business impacts on your organization.

Most markets are evolving faster than ever before, and the trend seems to be accelerating, so organisations globally need to adapt and change the way they go to market. From a business standpoint, the flexibility and speed with which new solutions can be delivered via cloud help enable the business units to react faster and better. So much so, that where IT organisations have not considered automating aspects of provisioning to provide more flexibility and faster access to resources, business units have started going outside of IT, to some of the public cloud offerings, for resources.

Planning for cloud should consider people and processes, as both will likely be directly impacted. From the requisition of resources, all the way to charging back the different business units for resources consumed, managed independently from projects’ budgets, processes that were created and used before the advent of cloud in your organisation should be adapted, if not discarded and rebuilt from scratch. IT will need to change and evolve as it becomes an internal service provider (in many instances, a P&L entity) – and resources broker for the business units.

Considering the large capital investments IT has typically been getting as budget to ‘keep the lights on’, and considering that, until recently, this budget had been growing at double digits rate since the early days of mainframe; the switch from a capital investment model to an operational model can impact the way IT does business significantly. Indeed, we have seen the shift forcing IT to focus on what it can do better, review its relationships with the vendors, ultimately freeing up the valuable investment resources. In many organisations, this has also translated to enabling net new projects to come to life, in and out of IT.

Once this transformation is underway, you should start seeing some of the benefits other organisations have been enjoying, starting with faster speed to market on new offerings. Indeed, in this age of mobile everything, customers expect access to everything all the time, and your competition is likely launching new offerings every day. A move towards cloud enables projects to move forward at an accelerated pace, letting you go to market with updated offerings much faster.

Benoit Quintin, Director Cloud Services, ESI Technologies

Review of Télécom 2016

This was the 13th edition of this annual event organized by Comtois-Carignan. ESI Technologies participated in the Industry Day on Tuesday April 26 during which 34 presentations on topics related to telecom, IT and contact centres were offered.

For a third consecutive year, we presented a conference this time on threat evolution and data protection. Installing security devices such as firewalls or first-generation IPS was before common and sufficient to protect organizations against threats that might affect the operations of a company’s activities. Today, the rapid evolution of malicious activity requires installing new solutions to better protect our assets. Our presentation provided an excellent overview of these solutions: next generation firewalls and IPS, protection systems against advanced threats, security for web browsing, email security and unified authentication services.

Participants were able to ask questions about these pioneering technologies, protection solutions that provide control and visibility to better react to a threat detected in the environment.

During the industry cocktail, 42 partner booths were available for participants to discuss technologies and service offerings. This cocktail formula is highly appreciated by participants, giving them the opportunity to discuss and share views on presentations of the day.

If you missed the ESI presentation, please contact us so we can share its content with you.

Roger Courchesne – Networking and Security Practice Manager

Cloud computing: strategy and IT readiness – Transformation in IT

Here is the first of a series of articles that provide both business and IT executives insights into the key issues that they should consider when evaluating cloud services, paying particular attention to business and legal ramifications of moving to the cloud environment, whether it is private, hybrid or public.

cloud-question-mark-710x345For the last few decades, IT organisations have been the only option for provisioning IT resources for projects. Indeed, all new projects would involve IT, and the IT team was responsible for acquiring, architecting and delivering the solution that would sustain the application/project during its lifecycle, planning for upgrades along the way.
This led to silo-based infrastructures – and teams -, often designed for peak demand, without possibilities of efficiency gains between projects. The introduction of compute virtualization, first for test/dev and then for production, showed other options were possible and available and that by aggregating requirements across projects, IT could get significant efficiencies of scale and costs while getting more flexibility and speed to market, as provisioning a virtual server suddenly became a matter of days, rather than weeks or months.
Over time, IT started applying these same methods to storage and network and these showed similar flexibility, scalability and efficiency improvements. These gains, together with automation capabilities and self-service portals, were combined over time to become what we know as ‘cloud offerings’.
In parallel to this, IT, in some organisations, has become structured, organized, usually silo’d, and, unfortunately, somewhat slow to respond to business needs. This has led to a slow erosion of IT’s power and influence over IT resources acquisition, delivery and management. Coupled with the existing commercial/public cloud options these days, capital is rapidly leaving the organisation for 3rd party public cloud vendors, also known as shadow IT. This raises concerns, not the least of which being that funds are sent outside the organisation to address tactical issues, typically without regard to legal implications, data security or cost efficiency. These issues highlight IT’s necessity to react faster, become more customer driven, deliver more value and provide its stakeholders with flexibility matching that of public cloud. Essentially, IT needs to evolve to become a business partner; cloud computing providing the tools by which IT offers flexibility, scalability and speed to market that the business units are looking for in today’s market.

Benoit Quintin, Director Cloud Services, ESI Technologies

Where’s the promised agility?

The world of technology solutions integrators has changed dramatically in the last 10 years.

Customers are more educated than ever before through access to a world of information available on the Internet. It is estimated that 80% of customer decision-making is made online before they even reach out to us. This is not just true of our industry. The Internet is now woven into the fabric of society and clients now go to the veterinary clinic with the belief that they already identified their pet’s disease since “the Internet” provided them with a diagnosis!

agility380w_0What about the promises of industry giants? Simplified IT, reduced OPEX, increased budgets for projects instead of maintenance, etc.?

How can we explain that we don’t witness this in our conversations with customers? How is it that we still see today clients who have embraced those technologies also admit they are now faced with greater complexity than before? Perhaps the flaw comes exactly from the fact that 80% of decisions are made based on well designed and manufactured web marketing strategies…

Regardless of the technological evolution, the key it seems is still architecture design, thought with a business purpose and IT integration strategy tailored to your specific needs with the help of professionals. Just as a veterinarian is certainly a better source of information than the Internet to look after your pet…

For over 20 years, ESI designs solutions that are agile, scalable and customized to the specific needs of organisations. ESI works closely with customers to bridge the gap between business needs and technology, maximizing ROI and providing objective professional advice.

Cloud’s Biggest Challenge: Data Sovereignty Laws

Cloud technologies are now integrated in the solutions used by companies: the promise of standardization and simplification without regard to physical or geographic boundaries, meets the requirements of corporate flexibility for an access to data anywhere, at all times on all their devices.

This explosion of virtualized data now requires countries to legislate to protect their citizens’ data, and forces cloud providers to implement practices which respect increasingly strict rules of governance, requiring from companies that collect, use and store data to keep them in the country where they were collected.

Organizations rely on the expertise of cloud solution providers but the best technology does not exempt them to think and plan, as ultimately they remain accountable for their data, no matter where they are hosted. Organizations have the responsibility to respect the laws of the countries where they operate.

How can we ensure to deal with a cloud provider who complies with the laws of the country?

It is the organization’s duty to establish proper governance rules and controls to ensure compliance of solutions in place. If technology is an invaluable resource, you must not make the mistake of being influenced by a specific solution. In other words, do your homework!

Data_Center-1024x682Create your roadmap – Where do you plan to expand your market? In case of expansion, start to gather information on the laws in force in the target countries to know the restrictions imposed by their legislation to assess what it will cost you to comply with them.
Learn about your cloud provider – Where is your data stored by the provider? Does it respect your governance rules? Is the provider able to provide proof?
Assess the strategic importance of compliance – Compliance with governance rules is not the same for everyone. How important is data protection to your business and how many resources are you willing to dedicate to it? You can manage data sovereignty on your own, or entrust it to an external provider.

Canadian integrators and datacentre providers are the way to go to give companies the option to do business with partners who understand the needs of their stakeholders, close to where they do business.

Patrick Naoum, Executive Vice-President – Strategy, Alliance and Client Solutions

See on this subject the article by Mike Ettling, President of SAP SuccessFactors: http://techcrunch.com/2015/12/26/the-clouds-biggest-threat-are-data-sovereignty-laws/

The IT Catch-22

OK, so everyone’s taking about it. Our industry is undergoing major changes. It’s out there. It started with a first architecture of reference with mainframes and minicomputers designed to serve thousands of applications used by millions of users worldwide. It then evolved with the advent of the Internet into the “client-server” architecture, this one designed to run hundreds of thousands of applications used by hundreds of millions of users. And where are we now? It appears we are witnessing the birth of a third generation of architecture, one of which is described by the IDC as “the next generation compute platform that is accessed from mobile devices, utilizes Big Data, and is cloud based”. It is referred to as “the third platform”. It is destined to deliver millions of applications to billions of users.

3rd platformVirtualization seems to have been the spark that ignited this revolution. The underlying logic of this major shift is that virtualization allows to make abstraction of hardware, puts it all in a big usable pool of performance and assets that can be shared by different applications for different uses according to the needs of different business units within an organization. The promise of this is that companies can and have more with less. Therefore, IT budgets can be reduced!
These changes are huge. In this third platform IT is built, is run, is consumed and finally is governed differently. Everything is changed from the ground up. It would seem obvious that one would need to invest in careful planning of the transition from the second to the third platform. What pace can we go at? What can be moved out into public clouds? What investments are required on our own infrastructure? How will it impact our IT staff? What training and knowledge will they require? What about security and risks?
The catch is the following: the third platforms allows IT to do much more with less. Accordingly, IT budgets are reduced or at best, flattened. Moving into the third platform requires investments. Get it? Every week we help CIOs and IT managers raise this within their organization so that they can obtain the required investments they need to move into the third platform to reap the benefits of it.

Give me your backups!

image7Backing up data is at the heart of the activities of all businesses. However, the current legislation in the countries where companies are doing business requires respect to strict governance rules in order to comply with the agencies that regulate the markets and ensure the probity of organizations and their activities. One of our clients got a visit from anti-corruption officers, who requisitioned their backups months ago. The nature of the methodology used by the client for their backups is not conducive to find information quickly for the officers, preventing them to give back the copies to the client… To remedy this situation for the future, our client seeks to purchase an archiving solution to not only comply with the law, but above all to be able to recover their data in a reasonable time.
Businesses require increasingly archiving solutions to enforce governance regulations.

Companies are required to cooperate with the authorities and answer of their actions at all times. That’s what the compliance archiving solution provides. It is characterized by the ability to conduct legal research through the history of emails, attachments and files of the company. It also provides a methodology to protect relevant data on legal hold and easily export that information for the people requesting it.

The cost of inaccessibility to the company’s backups, the time required to retrieve the data, perform a search of suspicious documents and start the process over for the next time, is much more expensive than having a compliance archiving system that will perform the same task in minutes instead of hours or even days or weeks. The value added math is simple for our clients.

Michel Rail, Senior Consultant – Architecture & Technologies

Review of NetApp Insight 2015

Logo NetApp Insight 2015

The 2015 Edition of NetApp Insight was held in Las Vegas from October 12 to 15. The event is comprised of general sessions, more than 400 breakout sessions, the Insight Central zone with partner booths, hands-on labs, a “meet the engineer” section and offers the possibility to complete certification exams onsite.
The general sessions were presented by different NetApp personalities, CEO, CIO, technical directors, engineers, the NetApp cofounder Dave Hitz, as well as partners and guests (including Cisco, Fujitsu, VMware, 3D Robotics).
Last year, the “Data Fabric” term was unveiled to identify NetApp’s vision of cloud computing. This year, most of the presentations were intended to make that vision more concrete, through examples, demonstrations and placed in context.
For NetApp, Data Fabric is synonymous with data mobility, wherever it resides, whether in traditional datacentres or in the cloud. The key to this mobility lies in SnapMirror, which should soon be supported by various NetApp platforms, FAS, Cloud ONTAP, NetApp Private Storage (PS), AltaVault, etc. and orchestrated by global tools such as OnCommand Cloud Manager and the adaptation of existing tools.
Still on the topic of cloud, a Cisco speaker presented the current issues and future trends: with the exponential use of devices (tablets, smartphones and connected devices) and the increasingly frequent move of data (and even of the compute) to the edge, accessibility, availability, security and data mobility therefore becomes an increasingly important issue. In short, the cloud trend belongs to the past, we now must talk about edge!
NetApp has also put forward its All-Flash FAS type entreprise solutions which, thanks to new  optimizations can now seriously compete in high performance and very low latency environments.
The number of breakout sessions was impressive and in four days, one can only expect to attend about 20 of the 400 sessions available.
Insight is open to clients since last year, but some sessions remain reserved for NetApp partners and employees. Some information are confidential, but without giving details and non-exhaustively, we can mention that a new generation of controllers and tablets are to be expected soon, that SnapCenter will eventually replace SnapManager (in cDOT only) and that new much more direct transition options from 7-Mode to cDOT will be made available.
Other sessions also helped to deepen knowledge or to discover some very interesting tools and features.
In conclusion, NetApp Insight is a must, to soak up in the NetApp line of solutions as much as to find out what NetApp’s vision and future direction will be.

Olivier Navatte, ESI Storage Specialist