Cloud Strategy – human impacts across organization

Here is part five of our series covering the key issues to consider before adopting cloud technologies. This month, we discuss the impact on human resources.

Resources in your organisation will be impacted by this change. Both on the IT side and on the business side. While helping companies move to cloud we have had to assist with adapting IT job descriptions, processes and roles within the organisation.

As the IT organisation moves into a P&L role, its success starts to be tied to the adoption by the stakeholders of the services offered. To do this, IT needs to get closer to the business units, understand their requirements and deliver access to resources on-demand. All this cannot happen unless things change within the IT group.

As companies automate their practice, and create a self-service portal to provision resources, some job descriptions need to evolve. A strong and clear communication plan with set milestones helps employees understand the changes coming to the organisation, and involving them in the decision process will go a long way to assist in the transition. We have seen that IT organisations with a clear communication plan at the onset that involved their employees in the process had a much easier transition, and faster adoption rate than those who did not.

Our experience helping customers with cloud computing shows that cloud alters significantly IT’s role and relationship with the business, and employees’ roles need to evolve. Training, staff engagement in the transition and constant communication will help your organisation significantly move to this new paradigm.

Benoit Quintin, Director Cloud Services – ESI Technologies

The greatest IT confusion ever?

Does it even beat Y2K? It’s been a year now since I rejoined the IT integration industry. When I left it in 2003 to focus on PKI technologies, it was still the good old days of client server IT infrastructure right after Y2K and the dot-com bubble burst. For a year now I have been trying to understand clients’ challenges to see how I can help. For a year now I have observed my clients trying themselves to understand the mutations that appear to be changing the IT industry and how it affects them not only on a business level but also on professional AND personal levels as well. I find them fearful and closed. Witnessing this, I told a colleague of mine “it seems our clients are capable of telling us what they don’t want but rarely have a clear vision of what they’re aiming for”!Trending concepts
Big data, the internet of things, stuff called cloud, anything anywhere anytime on any device, the software defined companies etc. – all these new terminologies are being bombarded to our clients and are supposed to showcase the many new trends in the industry. I have recently been to a seminar where the audience was separated in three categories: traditional IT folks who resist these changes and new trends because they reshape traditional IT infrastructure and thus may even jeopardize their job definition or security, new line of business managers who embrace change and are shopping for apps that get the job done and high management who talk the numbers’ language (growth percentage, market share and other measurable KPIs) with whom you need to be able to prove ROI (not TCO this is the IT folks’ concerns).
And there we have it: widespread confusion and fear. Y2K all over again? People forget, BI has been around for a while, so has the Internet, thin client environments, databases etc. It’s just happening on a different scale and the challenge remains to bridge the gap between corporate and business objectives as defined by high management, finding the right tools and processes to get the job done by line of business owners and IT that still has an important role in solution selection, integration and support be it on site or off site.
My challenge over the last year has been to overcome those fears so as to allow my clients to have open discussions on their business objectives and avoid the use of buzz words to refocus on “where do you want to be in three to five years as a company, what IT tools will be required to help you get there and what are the ones I can help you with”.

Charles Tremblay, ESI account manager

A new day is dawning for the Montreal Children’s Hospital

MCH logoI am a strong supporter of children’s health. I believe we have a duty to protect our children because they are the foundation of the future of our society. This is why I have been an active member of the Montreal Children’s Hospital Foundation Board for the last 8 years, and the Board’s Chair for the last 4 years. One of our biggest achievements is without a doubt, to have contributed to the fundraising efforts to build a new world class hospital bringing closer together care, research and teaching. This dream has finally become a reality on May 24th, 2015 when the staff, professionals and patients of the Montreal Children’s Hospital moved to their new address on the Glen site of the McGill University Health Centre.
Among the benefits of the new hospital we find:

  • World-class pediatric care installations
  • 154 individual rooms to prevent the spread of infections and provide care at the patient’s bedside
  • The latest equipment and technologies to diagnose quickly and treat less invasively
  • Holistic approach focused on healing and playing to ensure children’s development and reduce the stress of the hospital stay
  • Intensive care tailored for the specific needs of young patients

I believe that supporting philanthropic initiatives anchors a company and its employees in their community, which is why, as a long-time member of the Children’s Foundation, I am particularly proud of ESI’s contribution and our truly positive impact in our community. As an entrepreneur, I believe that creating a culture of giving is about making a positive impact through our actions, and the new Montreal Children’s Hospital is just a perfect example of this.

Greg Rokos, President of ESI
Chairman of the Board, Montreal Children’s Hospital Foundation

Telepresence: the all too often underestimated or overlooked investment

20.CiscoTelepresence

 

 

 

For a second time in the last couple of weeks, I was sitting in one of my client’s many small conference rooms equipped with telepresence. I found myself participating in a solutions meeting with his team members located in four different cities. And there we were, holding a meeting as if everyone was around the table being able to appreciate everyone’s body language. How quickly we all forgot we were not in the same room because it felt as though we were.
This is when it dawned on me that telepresence is underestimated. To get that feeling of truly being on the same page with everyone is priceless especially when you are engaging on client’s strategic projects that will have an impact on the way their team operates and performs. I strive to work in harmony with client’s values and corporate culture. Being in the presence of the client’s team made me understand why this client was so successful in their industry: civil engineering. They also need to be as close as possible to their own clients and partners working on remote construction sites all over the world.
It is only afterwards that I learned that the telepresence they had was purposely built for them by a business partner of ours. Having witnessed firsthand the effectiveness of telepresence as a way to bring together teams of people, I will no longer think of telepresence as something that’s only a hype or a cool thing to have. It can be a game changer for many businesses!

Charles Tremblay, ESI account manager