When choosing a cloud provider, it pays to think small!

When you buy wine, do you go to the big discount store or the local specialty retailer? Chances are you do both, depending on the situation. The big-box store has selection and low prices, but the people who run wine store on the corner can delight you with recommendations you couldn’t find anywhere else.

The same dynamics apply to choosing a cloud service provider. When you think of cloud vendors, there are probably four or five company names that immediately come to mind. But if you Google rankings of cloud vendors according to customer satisfaction or relevance to small businesses, you’ll find quite a different list. There are hundreds of small, regional and specialty infrastructure-as-a-service providers out there. In many cases, they offer value that the giants can’t match. Here are five reasons to consider them.

Customer service – this is probably the number one reason to go with a smaller hosting provider. If you have a problem, you can usually get a person on the phone. Over time, the service provider gets to know you and can offer advice or exclusive discounts. The company just can’t match this personalized service.

Specialty knowledge – You can find apps for just about anything in the marketplace sections of the big cloud companies, but after that you’re pretty much on your own. If struggling with configuration files and troubleshooting Apache error messages isn’t your cup of tea, then look for a service provider that specializes in the task you’re trying to accomplish. Not only do you usually get personal service, but the people are experts in the solutions they support. They’ll get answers fast.

A smile and a handshake – There are several good reasons to choose a vendor in your geographic area. For one thing, government-mandated data protection laws may require it. Local providers also offer a personal touch that call centers can’t match. You can visit their facilities, meet with them to plan for your service needs and get recommendations for local developers or contractors you might need. Many small vendors also offer colocation options and on-site backup and disaster recovery. The technology world where sometimes everything seems to have gone virtual, it’s nice to put a name with a face.

Low cost – This sounds counterintuitive, but the reality is that many specialty providers are cheaper than the cloud giants. That’s particularly true if they specialize in an application like WordPress or Drupal, or in a service like backup. These companies can leverage economies of scale to offer competitive prices, then you get all the other benefits of their specialized knowledge. Shop around; you might be surprised.

Performance – If the primary users of the cloud service are people in your company and/or in your geographic region, you will probably realize better performance with a local vendor. That’s simply the law of physics. The farther electrons have to travel, the longer it takes them to reach their destination. This is particularly important if you plan to use services like cloud storage or if you need to transfer large files, an error-prone process that only gets worse with distance.

Cloud Strategy: technological impacts

Here is part four of our series covering the key issues to consider before adopting cloud technologies. This article focuses specifically on technological impacts to consider.

Not all software technology is created equal. Indeed, not every application will migrate gracefully to the cloud, some will never tolerate the latency, while others were never designed to have multiple smaller elements working together, rather than a few big servers. This means your business applications will need to be evaluated for cloud readiness. Indeed, this is possibly the largest technological hurdle, but, as with all technology, this may prove to be easier to solve that some of the other organisational issues.

One should look at the application’s architecture (n-tiered or monolithic), tolerance to faults/issues (e.g. latency, network errors, services down, servers down) and how the users consume the application (always from a PC, from the office, or fully decentralized, with offline and mobile access), to evaluate options for migrating an application to the cloud. Current growth rate and state of the organisation are often times mirrored in its IT consumption rate and requirements. Certainly, an organisation that’s under high growth rates or launching a project where growth is not easily identifiable can possibly benefit significantly from a scalable, elastic cloud model, whereas an organisation with slower growth, familiar / standard projects and predictable IT requirements will not likely assess the value of cloud computing the same way. Accountability of resources and traceability of all assets in use may be of bigger concern.

Architecture, applications and legacy environments are all technological considerations that should be factored in any cloud computing viability & readiness assessment, but that should probably not be the main driver for your cloud strategy.

Benoit Quintin, Director Cloud Services – ESI Technologies

Cloud computing: strategy and IT readiness – Transformation in IT

Here is the first of a series of articles that provide both business and IT executives insights into the key issues that they should consider when evaluating cloud services, paying particular attention to business and legal ramifications of moving to the cloud environment, whether it is private, hybrid or public.

cloud-question-mark-710x345For the last few decades, IT organisations have been the only option for provisioning IT resources for projects. Indeed, all new projects would involve IT, and the IT team was responsible for acquiring, architecting and delivering the solution that would sustain the application/project during its lifecycle, planning for upgrades along the way.
This led to silo-based infrastructures – and teams -, often designed for peak demand, without possibilities of efficiency gains between projects. The introduction of compute virtualization, first for test/dev and then for production, showed other options were possible and available and that by aggregating requirements across projects, IT could get significant efficiencies of scale and costs while getting more flexibility and speed to market, as provisioning a virtual server suddenly became a matter of days, rather than weeks or months.
Over time, IT started applying these same methods to storage and network and these showed similar flexibility, scalability and efficiency improvements. These gains, together with automation capabilities and self-service portals, were combined over time to become what we know as ‘cloud offerings’.
In parallel to this, IT, in some organisations, has become structured, organized, usually silo’d, and, unfortunately, somewhat slow to respond to business needs. This has led to a slow erosion of IT’s power and influence over IT resources acquisition, delivery and management. Coupled with the existing commercial/public cloud options these days, capital is rapidly leaving the organisation for 3rd party public cloud vendors, also known as shadow IT. This raises concerns, not the least of which being that funds are sent outside the organisation to address tactical issues, typically without regard to legal implications, data security or cost efficiency. These issues highlight IT’s necessity to react faster, become more customer driven, deliver more value and provide its stakeholders with flexibility matching that of public cloud. Essentially, IT needs to evolve to become a business partner; cloud computing providing the tools by which IT offers flexibility, scalability and speed to market that the business units are looking for in today’s market.

Benoit Quintin, Director Cloud Services, ESI Technologies

IBM Flash Storage – it’s all about applications

Your backup, storage and archiving processes must provide availability and quick and easy real-time data access, whilst evolving with constant technological changes. As a specialized storage solution integrator, ESI offers storage audit assessments analyzing companies’ lifecycle of digital information, validating its integrity and the interaction of the storage solutions with their other systems.

As a storage expert, we are often required to recommend products to our clients to improve their performance targets, solutions to consolidate application hardware and licensing, while increasing response time of critical applications.

IBM’s FlashSystem is a solution tailored for the needs of entreprises faced with performance, productivity and reliability issues.

IBMFlashSystemsFlash Storage increases user and data center productivity, company revenues, saves on software licence fees (low TCO), electricity consumption, rack space and computer downtime.

FlashSystem accelerates applications, eliminates single points of failure with 2D Flash RAID.

IBM’s FlashSystem is easy to install, easy to manage and easy to service!

ESI helps you optimize your IBM FlashSystem and takes your organization at its highest level of performance!

Contact us to plan a demo of IBM FlashSystem features!

The greatest IT confusion ever?

Does it even beat Y2K? It’s been a year now since I rejoined the IT integration industry. When I left it in 2003 to focus on PKI technologies, it was still the good old days of client server IT infrastructure right after Y2K and the dot-com bubble burst. For a year now I have been trying to understand clients’ challenges to see how I can help. For a year now I have observed my clients trying themselves to understand the mutations that appear to be changing the IT industry and how it affects them not only on a business level but also on professional AND personal levels as well. I find them fearful and closed. Witnessing this, I told a colleague of mine “it seems our clients are capable of telling us what they don’t want but rarely have a clear vision of what they’re aiming for”!Trending concepts
Big data, the internet of things, stuff called cloud, anything anywhere anytime on any device, the software defined companies etc. – all these new terminologies are being bombarded to our clients and are supposed to showcase the many new trends in the industry. I have recently been to a seminar where the audience was separated in three categories: traditional IT folks who resist these changes and new trends because they reshape traditional IT infrastructure and thus may even jeopardize their job definition or security, new line of business managers who embrace change and are shopping for apps that get the job done and high management who talk the numbers’ language (growth percentage, market share and other measurable KPIs) with whom you need to be able to prove ROI (not TCO this is the IT folks’ concerns).
And there we have it: widespread confusion and fear. Y2K all over again? People forget, BI has been around for a while, so has the Internet, thin client environments, databases etc. It’s just happening on a different scale and the challenge remains to bridge the gap between corporate and business objectives as defined by high management, finding the right tools and processes to get the job done by line of business owners and IT that still has an important role in solution selection, integration and support be it on site or off site.
My challenge over the last year has been to overcome those fears so as to allow my clients to have open discussions on their business objectives and avoid the use of buzz words to refocus on “where do you want to be in three to five years as a company, what IT tools will be required to help you get there and what are the ones I can help you with”.

Charles Tremblay, ESI account manager

Citrix Summit 2015 – news to come

Back from the 2015 edition of Citrix Summit in Las Vegas, where the latest innovations and a lot of NDA content were presented to participants. Citrix is still a dominant player in the world of virtualization of applications and workstations, while adding a lot of new features in the various areas surrounding the practice.

From innovation to a better experience, Citrix did not officially announce its new Receiver X1 (X1 for Experience First), but mentioned it often during the different sessions. X1 made quite an impression when it was presented. Web-based on HTML 5, the X1 client is centrally managed and really easy to update. The web version of X1 enables customization of user experience through the browser. The experience will be the same regardless of the platform.

Citrix announced a broad selection of tech previews and updates for this year. Amongst which HDX Framehawk, Optimization Pack for Lync, DesktopPlayer for Windows and an XenDesktop Virtual Desktop agent for Linux.

The XenMobile 10 version respects the “Experience First” concept, as demonstrated in the following blog: http://blogs.citrix.com/2015/01/13/xenmobile-10-what-experience-means-for-it/

We now have today an average of 2.9 devices by user, which explains the importance of keeping them under control. For more information on the latest Xen Mobile version: http://www.citrix.com/news/announcements/jan-2015/citrix-delivers-superior-user-experience-and-security-in-new-xen.html

Citrix gave each participant of the Summit a prototype X1 mouse; this mouse offers Receiver X1 users the possibility to use X1 with their iPhone or iPad in their Citrix XenApp or XenDesktop environment.

Citrix mouse

In parallel with user experience, Citrix offers increased flexibility and security with their innovative products.

To conclude, the conference gave participants a technological preview of products and innovations proposed by Citrix and their partners. The increase of mobile devices is becoming an element of change that organizations must address and Citrix has found a tailored approach to this new reality.

Mobility transforms enterprises and people.

Guillaume Paré, Senior Consultant –  architecture & technologies