Cloud Strategy: data collection

Here is part 6 of our series covering the key issues to consider before adopting cloud technologies. This month, we discuss how to build your strategy and data points that must be considered.

When considering & building a cloud strategy, organisations need to consider business objectives/outcomes desired, quantifiable and time-bound goals as well as identify specific initiatives that the enterprise can and should undertake in order to execute the strategy and achieve the goals set. As shown by surveys on the subject by Gartner in 2013 and 2014, process and culture are likely to be big hurdles in any move to cloud. Therefore, involving all aspects of the business and gathering the right information can assist in building the right strategy and identify potential problems ahead of time.

The first concrete step to take to building this strategy is to gather the data points to identify and define those objectives, goals and initiatives for the entreprise in the near – and mid – terms. Once the data is collected, you can review, analyze and identify the business outcomes desired, set the (quantifiable) goals and define the specific initiatives you want to put in place to achieve them. This should not be a strict price or technology evaluation.

Data Collection
The data points needed will have to come from various parts of the organisation (business units, finance, HR and IT). Some of the information required may take the form of files, but a lot of the required information will reside with your staff directly, and so interviews should be a part of the data collection process. These interviews should take up to a few hours each and focus on the interviewees functions, processes used and required/desired business outcomes, to provide insight into the actual impacts to the business before creating your cloud strategy.

With this data, you will be in a position to account for all aspects touching cloud computing, to see what it will affect and how, to evaluate its effect on the balance sheet (positive or negative) and decide on your strategy moving forward.

Benoit Quintin, Director Cloud Services – ESI Technologies

Cloud Strategy: business impacts across the organization

Here is the second part of our series covering the key issues to consider before adopting cloud technologies. This article focuses specifically on business impacts on your organization.

Most markets are evolving faster than ever before, and the trend seems to be accelerating, so organisations globally need to adapt and change the way they go to market. From a business standpoint, the flexibility and speed with which new solutions can be delivered via cloud help enable the business units to react faster and better. So much so, that where IT organisations have not considered automating aspects of provisioning to provide more flexibility and faster access to resources, business units have started going outside of IT, to some of the public cloud offerings, for resources.

Planning for cloud should consider people and processes, as both will likely be directly impacted. From the requisition of resources, all the way to charging back the different business units for resources consumed, managed independently from projects’ budgets, processes that were created and used before the advent of cloud in your organisation should be adapted, if not discarded and rebuilt from scratch. IT will need to change and evolve as it becomes an internal service provider (in many instances, a P&L entity) – and resources broker for the business units.

Considering the large capital investments IT has typically been getting as budget to ‘keep the lights on’, and considering that, until recently, this budget had been growing at double digits rate since the early days of mainframe; the switch from a capital investment model to an operational model can impact the way IT does business significantly. Indeed, we have seen the shift forcing IT to focus on what it can do better, review its relationships with the vendors, ultimately freeing up the valuable investment resources. In many organisations, this has also translated to enabling net new projects to come to life, in and out of IT.

Once this transformation is underway, you should start seeing some of the benefits other organisations have been enjoying, starting with faster speed to market on new offerings. Indeed, in this age of mobile everything, customers expect access to everything all the time, and your competition is likely launching new offerings every day. A move towards cloud enables projects to move forward at an accelerated pace, letting you go to market with updated offerings much faster.

Benoit Quintin, Director Cloud Services, ESI Technologies